Cilantro and the science behind why some people love it and some people hate it
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Cilantro and the science behind why some people love it and some people hate it

According to SciShow, cilantro tastes like soap for about 4-14 percent of the population. Which isn’t that much, but for some people, just an accidental bite into a cilantro containing burrito can be overpowering.

There may be a scientific reason as to why some people love it and some people hate it. Some have even compared this herb to leave a soapy taste in their mouth. A survey by researchers at Cornell University claims that there is an awfully specific gene (OR6A2 gene) that makes some people feel so strongly about this. This codes for the receptor that picks up the scent of aldehyde chemicals. Aldehydes are the organic molecules that are found in perfumes, plants, and the human body.

In a 2001 paper by the University of Otago, anthropologist Helen Leah found that from the 16th century onward, cilantro was treated as an unwanted herb in European cuisine.

Of course, in saying that, some people may just not like cilantro due to simple preference. It was often disparaged for foul taste and smell. One recommendation could be to swap parsley in for cilantro.